Bethlen Castle in Criș

Errected by one of the great families of Transylvanian Hungarian counts, this wonderful castle with Renaissance influences of the 14th century was a source of inspiration for poets and artists alike. Some even say that you can meet ghosts and not just any kind: brides in search of lost love.


Built between the 14th and 17th centuries, as a small fortified noble residence. It has a fortified enclosure with a square plan, with circular bastions at the corners and a square entrance tower, a structure typical of late medieval military architecture. Built on two levels, the castle also has an emblematic and imposing circular tower (Archers' Tower) and a loggia with semicircular arched openings, supported on short cylindrical columns. The troubled history of the castle includes a series of robberies, after the Second World War (1949), when it was nationalized. Like many other noble residences in Transylvania, it became the seat of the local agricultural cooperative until 1976, when a first restoration process began, which lasted one year. After 1977, the castle remains abandoned, a victim to the robbers who take out the renaissance frames from the thickness of the wall. Some of them, probably considered worthless, were left abandoned in the grass in the castle courtyard. In 1991 the castle was a ruin, with collapsed roofs and piles of rubble covering many of the rooms, but is currently reviving as a Phoenix bird, thanks to the efforts of the heirs of the Bethlen family.

Visiting hours: Tuesday - Sunday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Price: 10 RON - suggested donation. 

Contact: contact@bethlen.ro. 

Spoken languages: Romanian, Hungarian


The castle is esily spotted in the center of the village of Criș, where you can get by car or bike&hike.

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